One Wybelenna by Shaun Lockyer Architects


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From the architect. Shaun Lockyer Architects (SL|a) formed in 2009 to focus on modernist architecture that connects people and place. SL|a engages in varying types of projects including residential, institutional, and commercial and interior design.

Conceptual framework:
This project was born out of a remnant of a Robin Gibson cottage that existed on the site. The design, inspired by the work of both Gibson (and Neutra in turn) is a contemporary re-interpretation of the modernist language. The planning is defined by stone blades that bisect the house and delineate living zones and pavilions. The house enjoys a long, linear plan with all rooms designed to soak up winter sun. A 25m pool defines the northern edge of the property and is bookended with dramatic outdoor living areas, both enjoying tall volumes and fire places. A turf roof covers the garaging and allows the house to ground itself into the existing contour of the land. A natural palette of zinc, tallowwood, slate and travertine create a robust aesthetic that aims toward a timeless architecture.

Public and Cultural Benefits:
The old Gibson cottage was a well known structure along Moggil Road that resonated with people irrespective of their architectural understanding. The continued dialogue of this language of architecture and the sustained existence of a stone pavilion in the original location maintains the houses place in local’s memory. In addition to this, the boundary fencing has been pulled back off the street to give over a significant landscape zone to the public realm, and in so doing maintains the sense of the house as a pavilion in the landscape.

Relationship of Built Form to Context:
The new guest pavilion sits on the original footprint of the Gibson cottage and re-uses the original stone (as has been preserved in every location possible). In addition to this, the original structural language and methods have been reinterpreted into a contemporary equivalent while avoiding mimicry of any form.

Program Resolution: Functional performance assessed against the brief
The planning of the house is all about functional living (therefore zoned for family living) while equally prioritising solar orientation (and view). To this end, the linear nature of the house addresses and responds to both of these agendas.

Integration of Allied Disciplines:
The structural method, integration of stone masons and landscape design are key aspects of the design and were considered from the outset, as was the environmental design strategy.

Sustainability:
The house has been designed with all ‘first principals” in mind as well as having been thermally engineered, wind patterns mapped, turf roofs included and a number of sustainability initiatives incorporated, including: 140,000L of water, 15kw of solar power, recycled timber, low e glass. 300 additional trees have been planted in the waterway area.

Response to Client needs:
The clients were particularly concerned with preservation of habitat and reuse of original site materials whilst maintaining a contemporary, reinterpretation of the original architecture. To this end, the original swimming pool was reused as a water tank and all of the existing stone was reclaimed. The turf roof provides an ongoing habitat for a plover (native bird species) family originally occupying the site, whilst simultaneously reducing glare and allowing the house to merge within the preserved landscape.

Promotional Summary:
One Wybelenna was a house born out of a remnant of a Robin Gibson cottage that existed on the site and was a bit of a landmark in the area. The design, inspired by the work of both Gibson (and Neutra in turn) is a contemporary re-interpretation of the modernist language and remains a narrative throughout the design down to the “orb” fireplace. The house enjoys a long, linear plan with all rooms designed to soak up winter sun and give direct pool and garden access for the long summers. The house, despite its size, has a strong sustainability agenda and includes turf roofs, 140,000L of water, 15KW of solar power, recycled materials (stone and timber) along with all the “first principal” design ideas that one would expect. A natural palette of zinc, tallowwood, slate and travertine create a robust aesthetic that aims toward a timeless architecture.

SUSTAINABILITY
One Wybelenna, while a luxury house, has a strong sustainability agenda. Apart from the obvious ‘first principal’ approach to the design with regards to northern sun, cross flow ventilation and thermal mass, a number of more sophisticated ideas have been incorporated. The house has been thermally engineered and wind patterns mapped, turf roofs as well as 140,000L of water (in the reused shell of the old swimming pool), 15kw of solar power, recycled timber (and some of the stone) and low-e glass. 300 additional trees have also been planted in the waterway area.

The old Gibson cottage was a well known structure along Moggil Road that resonated with passers-by. The “sustained existence” of a stone pavilion in Gibson’s original location maintains the houses place in the local’s memory. Boundary fencing has also been pulled back off the street to give over a significant landscape zone to the public realm.

Architects: Shaun Lockyer Architects
Location: Brookfield, Brisbane, Australia
Design Team: Shaun Lockyer ,Shane Marsh, Lucy Hyndman, Richard Pain, Corinne Bolton
Area: 1,012 sqm
Year: 2012
Structural Engineer: Bligh Tanner
Landscaping: Boss Landscapes
Photographs: Scott Burrows

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